Tobacco jar and stand with butterflies and flowers

Details

  • Catalogue text

    Square tobacco jar on a flat square tray with butterflies on a yellow ground.

    Cloisonné enamel was little used in Japan until the 1830s, when the first three-dimensional objects were made; the early pieces were muddy coloured and much use was made of wire to prevent slippage of the colours. The craft progressed fast and within sixty years was one of the finest of Meiji art-crafts.

    The flocculent yellow ground is typical of the work of Namikawa Yasuyuki (1845-1927) in the 1880s; this is simpler than most and must data from early in the decade. The museum owns Yasuyuki's handwritten receipt for this, which gives the day and the month but not, sadly, the year. This receipt enables us to identify other early and unsigned pieces by him.

    In: Impey, Oliver, and Joyce Seaman, Japanese Decorative Arts of the Meiji Period 1868-1912, Ashmolean Handbooks (Oxford: Ashmolean Museum, 2005)

Glossary of terms

cloisonné

Further reading

Impey, Oliver, and Joyce Seaman, Japanese Decorative Arts of the Meiji Period 1868-1912, Ashmolean Handbooks (Oxford: Ashmolean Museum, 2005), no. 33 on p. 70, pp. 8 & 22, illus. pp. 70-71

Reference URL

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